Cytotoxic T Cell Polarisation During Migration Investigated by Lattice Light-Sheet Microscopy

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Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are superb migrators and can traverse almost any tissue and physiological barrier in order to hunt down and eliminate cancer cells, and are thus often called 'killer T cells'. CTL are emerging as the mediators of choice in a new generation of highly targeted and effective cancer treatments, namely immunotherapies. As they search, CTL rapidly react to biochemical cues released by other cells, and alter their migration course and speed to effectively home in on potential targets. Receptors on the surface of the T cells must thus first 'sense' these cues and then initiate a process that reorients the cell towards the source, but precisely how this is achieved remains unknown. Lattice light-sheet microscopy, a revolutionising technology developed by Nobel Laureates and recently acquired by UNSW, capable of imaging the fast events associated with the CTL, will now for the first time enable the successful candidate to unravel this fundamental polarisation process.

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Supervisory team
Mate
Biro

Medicine
Medical Sciences
Senthil
Arumugam

Medicine
Medical Sciences
Kate
Poole

Medicine
Medical Sciences
m.biro@unsw.edu.au

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