Advanced defect detection techniques for high efficiency solar cells.

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Solar photovoltaics represent an increasing proportion of our energy mix. Commercial cells are limited by the presence of defects. To remove these defects, it is critical to know their structure. However, current characterisation techniques are unable to measure these defects (detection limit). The formidable challenge ahead lies in detecting one of the most dilute quantity measurable in the universe: one foreign atom for every quadrillion host atoms. The project will develop advanced defect detection techniques based novel electrical and optical characterisation tools, laying the groundwork for a new understanding of defect composition in high efficiency solar cells.

The PhD scholar will have a passion for fundamental physics, technology, innovation and strive to use their passion to make positive societal impact. They will engage with a wide range of university and industry players and immerse themselves in the start-up ecosystem to translate fundamental research into research activities that are relevant for the industry and society at large. Applicants will have been awarded a first-class BSc or BEng Honours degree (or equivalent) with a strong background in materials science, physics, photovoltaics or a related field. Undergraduate knowledge of semiconductor physics, solid-state physics, condensed-matter physics and optics is preferred.

Supervisory team
Fiacre
Rougieux

Engineering
Photovoltaic & Renewable Energy Engineering
Ned
Ekins-Daukes

Engineering
Photovoltaic & Renewable Energy Engineering
Murad
Tayebjee

Engineering
Photovoltaic & Renewable Energy Engineering
fiacre.rougieux@unsw.edu.au