Contextual modulation in human visual processing

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Contextual modulation is well-established as a fundamental characteristic of low-level sensory processing with moment-to-moment relevance to our perception. Contextual modulation refers to the sometimes profound effect of surrounding image structure on the perceptual properties of target regions contained within. As such, it has been argued to be diagnostic of the core computational principles underlying the neural coding of information. However, contextual modulation of higher-level visual processing remains largely unexplored. Here, we propose to use functional magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain to investigate contextual modulation throughout the visual processing hierarchy.

The candidate will need to be (or rapidly to become) proficient in stimulus creation, experiment implementation, and the collection and analysis of functional imaging data. It is imperative that the candidate has significant programming experience as well as a thorough understanding of visual perception and sensory neuroscience.

Supervisory team
Colin
Clifford

Science
Psychology
Damien
Mannion

Science
Psychology
Branka
Spehar

Science
Psychology
colin.clifford@unsw.edu.au