The Function of Remedies in International Law: Unity in Diversity?

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States, businesses, NGOs and individuals are increasingly turning to courts to resolve international disputes on diverse issues: South China Sea, Russia’s occupation of Crimea, climate change, the deaths of garment factory-workers. Critical to the successful resolution of these disputes are the remedies for the harm suffered. Yet remedies are no longer just about restoring a lawful situation; they now also impact the regulation of relationships and foster institutional change. This project will examine how and why remedies are used in different ways under international law so as to show their potential to better manage international conflicts in the future.

The ideal candidate will be fascinated by the resolution of disputes under international law. They will possess an undergraduate degree in Law of at least second-class honours (i) level (or equivalent). Preferably, the candidate will also hold a postgraduate qualification in Law or a related discipline with an average that equates to an upper Distinction average at UNSW (80%). Candidates who have work experience in international dispute settlement, as well as previous research experience (including completion of a research thesis and / or publications) are strongly encouraged.

Supervisory team
Natalie
Klein

Law
Law
Jonathan
Bonnitcha

Law
Law
Lucas
Lixinski

Law
Law
Register to Apply
Non-UNSW staff/students must Register to Apply
n.klein@unsw.edu.au
Law