Governing practice, reducing resistance: A sociological study of antibiotic governance

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Within a decade, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) will present the most significant threat to humanity of the 21st Century. A key solution is to judiciously use our remaining antimicrobials, yet misuse continues virtually unabated. This 'antimicrobial perfect storm' is a profoundly social issue in that we are failing to govern effectively and act in the present to secure our collective future. This study will examine governance of antimicrobials in Australia, with a focus on the social, economic and political dimensions of how hospitals regulate their use, drawing on qualitative data including interviews with doctors, nurses and pharmacists

The ideal candidate will hold an honours or masters level degree (or equivalent) in sociology, social science, health science or public health, and will have an interest in infectious diseases and/or antimicrobial resistance. A candidate with a clinical background (e.g. a doctor, nurse, pharmacist or allied health professional) who has undertaken additional training in the social sciences (as many do) would be an excellent fit. We have a high degree of confidence that exceptional candidates from within and beyond Australia will apply for this exciting opportunity to work collaboratively with a highly productive research team.

Supervisory team
Alexander
Broom

Arts & Social Sciences
Centre for Social Research in Health
Emma
Kirby

Arts & Social Sciences
Centre for Social Research in Health
Katherine
Kenny

Arts & Social Sciences
Centre for Social Research in Health
a.broom@unsw.edu.au