Impact of precision medicine on families of children with cancer

Back to search results
High-risk childhood cancer patients have a low survival rate with current treatments. The PRISM precision medicine trial makes personalised therapeutic recommendations for these children. Despite great optimism surrounding precision medicine, it will not be possible to cure all children. Precision medicine trials are very complex, meaning that families, and even healthcare professionals, may have difficulties understanding precision medicine. PRISM-IMPACT aims to assess families’ and healthcare providers’ expectations, hopes, and understanding of PRISM. By better understanding their experiences, we will be able to intervene early, provide educational support, increase satisfaction with care and improve quality of life among families in PRISM.

Our ideal candidate will have tertiary education in a health-related area (e.g. psychology, biomedical sciences, genetic counselling). The candidate will have a passion for pursuing a career in psycho-oncology and precision medicine. The candidate will have previous experience in research and preferably have training in both qualitative and quantitative data collection and analysis, writing of ethics applications and preparation of manuscripts. The candidate will have excellent interpersonal skills and will be able to demonstrate empathy working with families affected by cancer. The candidate will be able to meet deadlines and work in a self-directed manner. The candidate will have excellent written and communication skills and will enjoy working in a multi-disciplinary team. The candidate will have experience working with software such as STATA, SPSS, NVivo and Endnote.

 

Supervisory team
Claire E.
Wakefield

Medicine
Women's & Children's Health
David
Ziegler

Medicine
Women's & Children's Health
Janine
Vetsch

Medicine
Women's & Children's Health
Register to Apply
Non-UNSW staff/students must Register to Apply
c.wakefield@unsw.edu.au