Modeling stepping-stones of cane toad invasion with network analysis

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In the face of global environmental change and during Earth’s “sixth mass extinction”, maintaining or enhancing landscape ‘connectivity’- the degree to which the landscape facilitates or impedes movement, has been widely advocated as a key conservation tool. Connectivity is not always beneficial as it can also aid in the spread of disease, pollution and invasive species. This project will integrate complex network modelling using graph theory and time-series of habitat networks from satellite data to identify which areas have facilitated the infamous cane toad invasion in arid Australia and thus identify areas that should be targeted to prevent further expansion.

A background in modelling and analysing large, spatially explicit data sets is required. The position would suit a recent graduate in ecology but with spatial analysis knowledge and well developed quantitative skills or a quantitative student that is keen to learn more about ecology. Good presentation and writing skills would be beneficial. A demonstrated enthusiasm for research is paramount.

Supervisory team
Mirela
Tulbure

Science
Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
David
Keith

Science
Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
Mike
Letnic

Science
Biological, Earth & Environmental Sciences
Mirela.Tulbure@unsw.edu.au