Preventing burn injury for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children

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Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are more likely than other Australian children to be hospitalized following a flame burn. Our current NHMRC funded study has found that if an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander child has a flame burn, they are less likely to have access to immediate first aid, which can impact time in hospital and recovery.

The focus of this PhD is to better understand the mechanism of injury; and to work with community members and clinicians to co-design and trial a burn prevention and first aid program among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.

Our ideal candidate will be an Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person with an undergraduate degree in allied health, medical sciences or nursing with honours. With experience in qualitative health research she/he will be skilled in the conduct of research working closely with Aboriginal and / or Torres Strait Islander families, communities and organisations. The candidate will be highly motivated, eager to work in a multidisciplinary team and committed to ongoing learning.

Supervisory team
Kate
Hunter

Medicine
The George Institute for Global Health
Sandra
Eades

Medicine
Centre for Big Data Health Research
Rebecca
Ivers

Medicine
The George Institute for Global Health
catherine.hunter@unsw.edu.au