Quantifying global water cycle change using ocean observations

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Global rates of rainfall and evaporation are amplifying rapidly as a consequence of global warming. Recent studies have suggested that this ‘water cycle’ could be amplifying faster than global climate models had predicted. More accurate quantification of water cycle change and its causes is urgently needed.
Changes in the water cycle leave an imprint on the ocean by changing ocean salinity. The candidate will quantify water cycle change based on new observations of ocean salinity and using novel methods developed by the supervisory team. These findings will help improve predictions of water cycle change that are relied upon by society.

The ideal candidate will marry a strong foundation degree (or degrees; including a postgraduate qualification equivalent to an Australian honours degree) in Physics, Mathematics, Engineering or the Geosciences (including Oceanography and Atmospheric Science) with evidence of excellence in research and development.

In particular the candidate should be able to demonstrate that they can act independently and creatively and that they understand the benefits research can have to society. Strong foundation knowledge and creative thinking will be critical to achieving world leading research outcomes. Furthermore a clear vision of the potential impact of the science undertaken will help sharpen research questions and foster effective translation of research into societal benefits.

Supervisory team
Jan
Zika

Science
Mathematics & Statistics
John
Church

Science
Climate Change Research Centre
Trevor
McDougall

Science
Mathematics & Statistics
j.zika@unsw.edu.au