Quantum simulations with dopant atoms in silicon

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Quantum simulators could be among the first quantum technologies to outperform classical computers. The ability to directly control interactions and measure correlations between spins of single atoms provides the most direct method to date to build quantum simulators for an entirely new class of technologically relevant artificial quantum systems. We are developing hardware-based quantum simulators to study such complex quantum systems, using phosphorous donors atoms in silicon as building blocks. The aim of this prestigious PhD project is to build a device with 30 interacting spins that enables simulations that go beyond of what is possible with current computers.

The ideal candidate for this project is curious about the application of state-of-the-art quantum technology in the real world. In this project the PhD candidate will utilise qubits in silicon, offering among the best coherence times demonstrated to date, to build an analog quantum hardware that solves problems that are intractable with conventional computers. The candidate needs to have a strong background in quantum physics, measurement techniques, and be willing to work in a team of highly motivated colleagues in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology. A honours or masters degree in physics, electrical engineering, or similar field with a strong focus on quantum mechanics is highly desirable.

 

Supervisory team
Sven
Rogge

Science
CQC2T
Joe
Salfi

Science
Physics
Simmons
Michelle

Science
Physics
s.rogge@unsw.edu.au